advance google search operators

Advance google search operators | part – 5

Google Operator Syntax

Advanced operators are additions to a query designed to narrow down the search results. Although they re relatively easy to use, they have a fairly rigid syntax that must be followed.
The basic syntax of an advanced operator is operator:search_term. When using advanced operators, keep in mind the following:

There is no space between the operator, the colon, and the search term. Violating this syntax can produce undesired results and will keep Google from understanding what it is you’re trying to do. In most cases, Google will treat a syntactically bad advanced operator as just another search term. For example, providing the advanced operator intitle without a following colon and search term will cause Google to return pages that contain the word intitle.

The search term portion of an operator search follows the syntax discussed in the previous chapter. For example, a search term can be a single word or a phrase sur- rounded by quotes. If you use a phrase, just make sure there are no spaces between the operator, the colon, and the first quote of the phrase.

Boolean operators and special characters (such as OR and +) can still be applied to advanced operator queries, but be sure they don’t get in the way of the separating colon.

Advanced operators can be combined in a single query as long as you honor both the basic Google query syntax as well as the advanced operator syntax. Some advanced operators combine better than others, and some simply cannot be combined. We will take a look at these limitations later in this chapter.

The ALL operators (the operators beginning with the word ALL) are oddballs. They are generally used once per query and cannot be mixed with other operators. Examples of valid queries that use advanced operators include these:

intitle:Google This query will return pages that have the word Google in their title.

intitle: “index of” This query will return pages that have the phrase index of in their title. Remember from the previous chapter that this query could also be given as intitle:index.of, since the period serves as any character.This technique also makes it easy to supply a phrase without having to type the spaces and the quotation marks around the phrase.

intitle: “index of” private This query will return pages that have the phrase index of in their title and also have the word private anywhere in the page, including in the URL, the title, the text, and so on. Notice that intitle only applies to the phrase index of and not the word private, since the first unquoted space follows the phrase index of. Google interprets that space as the end of your advanced operator search term and continues processing the rest of the query.

intitle: “index of” “backup files” This query will return pages that have the phrase index of in their title and the phrase backup files anywhere in the page, including the URL, the title, the text, and so on. Again, notice that intitle only applies to the phrase index of.

Google’s Advanced Operators

Google’s advanced operators are very versatile, but not all operators can be used everywhere,

1. Intitle and Allintitle

Search Within the Title of a Page

intitle

 

Function: restricts results to sites within the specified domain

Examples :  site:google.com fox will find all sites containing the word fox, located within the *.google.com domain

Allintitle

Function: restricts results to documents whose title contains all the specified phrases

Examples: allintitle:foxfire will find all sites with the words fox and fire in the title, so it’s equivalent to intitle:fox and intitle:fire

2. Intext and Allintext

Locate a String Within the Text of a Page

intext

FunctionFind text on pages

Examples: Usage: intext:Goodmorning ladies and gentlemen
                       Result:
will get sites with most those words in a phrase

allintext

Function:  Finds all text on page

Examples: Usage: intext:Goodmorning ladies and gentlemen
                      Result:exact
copy of text

3. Inurl and Allinurl

Finding Text in a URL

inurl

Function: restricts results to sites whose URL contains the specified phrase

Examples: inurl:foxfire will find all sites containing the word fire in the text and fox in the URL

allinurl

Function: restricts results to sites whose URL contains all the specified phrases

Examples: allinurl:foxfire will find all sites with the words fox and fire in the URL, so it’s equivalent to inurl:fox inurl:fire

5. Filetype

Narrow Search to Specific Sites

Function: restricts results to documents of the specified type

Examples: filetype:pdf fire will return PDFs containing the word fire, while filetype:xls fox will return Excel spreadsheets with the word fox

6. Link

Search for Links to a Page

Function:   restricts results to sites containing links to the specified location

Examples: link:www.google.com will return documents containing one or more links to www.google.com

7. Inanchor

Locate Text Within Link Text

Function: restricts results to sites containing links with the specified phrase in their descriptions

Examples: inanchor:fire will return documents with links whose description contains the word fire (that’s the actual link text, not the URL indicated by the link)

8. Cache

Show the Cached Version of a Page

Function: Cached version of site on google

Examples: cache:site.com

9. Numrange

Search for a Number

Function: restricts results to documents containing a number from the specified range

Examples: numrange:1100 fire will return sites containing a number from 1 to 100 and the word fire. The same result can be achieved with 1..100 fire Result:exact copy of text

10. Daterange

Search for Pages published within a certain date

Function: Search for Pages Published Within a Certain Date Range

Examples: daterange:2452164-2452164 “osama bin laden”

11. Info

Show Google’s Summary Information

Function: Show Google’s Summary Information about a particular thing

Examples : info: linux

12. Related

Show Related Sites

Function: The related operator displays sites that Google has determined are related to a site,

Examples:related:linux

13. Author

Search Groups for an Author of a Newsgroup Post

Function: The author operator will allow you to search for the author of a newsgroup post

Examples: author:[email protected]

14. Group

Search Group Titles

Function: This operator allows you to search the title of Google Groups posts for search terms

Examples: group:*.forsale

15. Insubject

Search Google Groups Subject Lines

Function: The insubject operator is effectively the same as the intitle search and returns the same results.

Examples: insubject:dragon

16. Msgid

Locate a Group Post by Message ID

Function: Locate a Group Post by Message ID

Examples: [email protected]

17. Stocks

Search for Stock Information

Function: The stocks operator allows you to search for stock market information about a particular company.

Examples: stock:wipro

18. Define

Show the Definition of a Term

Function: The phonebook operator searches for business and residential phone listings

Examples: phonebook:john darling ny

19. Phonebook

Search Phone Listing

Function: The define operator returns definitions for a search term. Fairly simple, and very straightfor- ward, arguments to this operator may be a word or phrase.

Examples: define:hacking

20. site

Narrow Search to Specific Sites

Function: restricts results to sites within the specified domain

Examples: site:google.com fox will find all sites containing the word fox, located within the *.google.com domain

Colliding Operators and Bad Search-Fu

As you start using advanced operators, you’ll realize that some combinations work better than others for finding what you’re looking for. Just as quickly, you’ll begin to realize that some operators just don’t mix well at all.

 

Mixing google Operators
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